Watts Up With That?

Guest post by Lorraine Yapps Cohen

California Air Resources Board (CARB) met on Thursday, May 24.  On the agenda was discussion toward deciding where and how to spend the billions raised from cap-and-trade carbon trading in the state.

At the public meeting was Betty Plowman, who attended the meeting to present a letter on behalf of the industries that CARB calls polluters, the California Construction Trucking Association (CCTA) and California Dump Truck Owners Association.  The letter describes CARB’s threats to these industries, induced by the Board’s regulations that are, in turn, based on junk science.  The letter’s signatories indicate intention to seek reparations for the regulated class under CARB’s repression in California.

CARB Chairman Mary Nichols let the clock conduct the agenda and closed the meeting at 5 p.m. before Plowman could present the letter. The world according to CARB disallows any voicing of concerns. 

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About Russ Steele
Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.

4 Responses to

  1. Dena says:

    This is going to get very interesting. California is not open to suggestions but there is something going on nobody is paying any attention to. I receive input from about 20 independent truckers over here in Arizona and most of them haul food and cargo. California is requiring they upgrade their trucks to something less than 5 years old in order to be able to enter the population centers. This will be a great hardship for them so they are debating weather they will continue to haul into California. Should these truckers stop hauling food into the area, I can can see California shortly having sky high food prices and possible food shortages. I wonder what the people will say and do when they can no longer get the food to fill their stomach. Truckers in state will also face the same problem so the fall may result in federal intervention in order to keep California from killing it’s self. After all, you can’t have all those left voters dying off on Obama. At least it will solve California’s obesity problem.

    • Russ says:

      Dena,

      It has been almost a year now, but there was a reporter from a local TV station that was interviewing truckers at a Central Valley truck stop right after the ruling were passed. Many said they could not afford the upgrade, and planned to park their trucks and retire, or sell the truck out of state and find other work. It was going to be impossible to borrow the money for the necessary upgrades and get any return on their investment. Local Nevada County truck owners held a meeting with our state assembly man Dan Logue about the cost impacts on their business. Not much happened from the meeting, the consequences are yet to come. We are starting a garden and collecting some extra supplies.

  2. sean2829 says:

    Regulatory maze, high barriers to entry, small fry pushed aside … sounds like the pharmaceutical industry. If you are a big company with deep pockets this is a great opportunity. With the price pressure from the indepedent truckers gone, the large firms remaining will become an oligarchy pushing trucking rates higher. If you are lucky, Walmart will thrive in this environment and keep a cap on prices. But you are California so your legislature will do all it can to run the Walmarts of the world out of the state.

  3. Dixon Cruickshank says:

    They also just announced they will no longer take public comment on the Agenda 21 Oceans and Waterways Commitee thing that was started by Excuctive order last year

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